Daily Challenges

  • November 20 - Day 21: COMMITTED TO EQUITY

    Thank you for being a part of the 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge. Our community has participated in a big way, showing that we are committed to the change that starts from within and reaches through our families, friend groups, professional networks, organizations, and community-wide actions.

    You are one of more than 110,000 people (and nearly 470 organizations) who participated in our local Racial Equity Challenge. As you know, it does not—and cannot—stop here. While this Challenge has helped to develop a deeper understanding of race, equity, and our collective role in improving our community, what we each choose to do next will define “success”.

    Rather than providing content for our final day, we are instead sharing questions for reflection, discussion, and action moving forward.

    Listen. Read. Process. Support. Talk. Act. GROW.
    Thank you, again, for your commitment to equity.


    REFLECT AND TAKE ACTION

    Questions to Consider for Self-Reflection:

    1. What were some of my assumptions about race and racial inequity before I started this Challenge? 
    2. In what ways have these assumptions been challenged? In what ways have they been reinforced?
    3. What are my identities and in what ways have my identities impacted my life? Have any of my identities provided me privilege or been a source of discrimination in certain environments?
    4. Where have I seen evidence of inequities and systemic and structural racism in my community?
    5. How can I talk to my family, friends, and colleagues about what I have experienced and learned during this Challenge?
    6. What changes or actions can I take to advance equity in my home, workplace, and community?


    Share What You Learned:

    Please continue this learning and dialogue with your family, friends, and networks. Register for the wrap-up session to participate in a final reflection, and please take the survey to share your thoughts and experiences.

     Day 21 Committed to Equity   21 Day challenge

     

     

    Take the Post-Challenge Survey

     

     

    21 Day Racial Equity Challenge Wrap Up


    Did you Complete Day 21 of the Challenge?  YES       NO


    Comments (-1)
  • November 19 - Day 20: A RACIAL EQUITY LENS

    One key element of the Racial Equity Challenge is to build the awareness, skill, and will to challenge. Challenge distorted history, stereotypes, implicit biases, single stories, and the continued use of discriminatory practices that prevent progress.

    This also means challenging our own ideas, perceptions, and understandings by actively experiencing things through a racial equity lens, and resetting our programming to see all people as individuals rather than members of a certain group that we have (consciously or unconsciously) affixed with labels and expectations.

    Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr., racial equity educator, author and co-founder of the 21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge, recommends changing what you notice. Next time you're with family, in your workplace or out in the world, pay attention to:

    • Who are your ten closest friends? What is the racial mix in this group?
    • How much time each day you are with people of your own racial identity?
    • What are the last five books you read or shows you watched? What is the racial mix of the authors, characters or actors?

    Check out the resources and self-reflection below to develop a stronger understanding of this issue, consider new ways to see life through a racial equity lens, and move toward building a racial equity culture at your work and in your personal life.


     LEARN

    The 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge does not support nor endorse any advertisements associated with the above content.


    REFLECT AND TAKE ACTION

    Questions to Consider for Self-Reflection:

    • What stereotypes, perceptions or understandings do you hold that you would like to challenge? 
    • How can diverse communities and leaders be engaged from the outset so they have a real opportunity to shape racial equity solutions and strategies?

    Local Ways to Get Involved:

    • Sign up for the 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge Wrap-Up event on December 3 from 2-3:30 p.m. hosted by YWCA of Rochester & Monroe County, Racial Equity & Justice Initiative (REJI), Causewave Community Partners, Catholic Charities Community Services, Common Ground Health, Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, Rochester-Monroe Anti-Poverty Initiative (RMAPI), University of Rochester, and United Way of Greater Rochester
    • Join the conversation at the M.K. Gandhi Institute Nonviolence News Happy Hour
    • Register for the University of Rochester Diversity Advisory Council and the Office of Equity and Inclusion's virtual event featuring award-winning educational leader, best-selling author, and expert on the psychology of racism, Dr. Beverly Daniel Tatum, on November 30 from 7-8 p.m.

    Share What You Learned:

    Use the images below to share that you learned about race and equity today,
    and use be sure to include #ROCequity.

     Day 20    21 Day challenge


    Did you Complete Day 20 of the Challenge?  YES       NO


    Comments (-1)
  • November 18 - Day 19: THE RACIAL EQUITY CHANGE PROCESS

    We must continue to challenge ourselves to do more, to increase our awareness of injustice, and to actively step up to build equity in our networks and communities. This Challenge has offered tools and resources to advance racial equity. Where you put your time and effort in this work is up to you.

    Change begins with each individual, and grows with intention and activism through networks, organizations, practices, and policies that advocate for inclusion and equity for all. Listening matters. Data matters. Representation matters. Actions matter.

    We are in this together, and together we can make a difference. What do you plan to do next?


    DID YOU KNOW...

    In the human services nonprofit sector in the U.S., 90% of CEOs and 90% of Board of Director Chairs are white. Board make-up impacts how it functions and the decisions it makes. Inclusive, representative Board and staffing can advance policies and decisions that support a racially equitable business and culture.
    -Leading with Intent BoardSource Index


     LEARN

    The 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge does not support nor endorse any advertisements associated with the above content.


    REFLECT AND TAKE ACTION

    Questions to Consider for Self-Reflection:

    • What one small shift can you do to strive to be more anti-racist?
    • How do you think policies can be hidden or difficult to see in operation?

    Local Ways to Get Involved:

    Share What You Learned:

    Use the images below to share that you learned about race and equity today,
    and use be sure to include #ROCequity.

     Day 19 The Racial Equity Change Process   21 Day challenge


    Did you Complete Day 19 of the Challenge?  YES       NO


    Comments (-1)
  • November 17 - Day 18: BEING AN ALLY

    The dictionary definition of ally is “a person or organization that cooperates with or helps another in a particular activity.” In today’s society, the term has taken on a more urgent and active meaning, however it is often misunderstood or misused to imply good intentions, often without action or with action for unproductive reasons.

    For this reason, ally or allyship can be triggering terms for those who experience racism, oppression, and discrimination on a regular basis. Informed action is important for those who strive to be allies with marginalized people and communities.

    According to Amélie Lamont in the guide below, being an ally doesn’t necessarily mean you fully understand what it feels like to be oppressed. It means you’re taking on the struggle as your own, and adding your voice or action alongside those who are oppressed. Being anti-racist is not a spectator sport, nor is it an individual activity. It requires recognizing and owning the privilege that you hold, to help carry the weight of oppression for, and in collaboration with, others.

    There is a place for each of us in this work. Check out the Dos and Don’ts, and helpful tips to becoming a better ally in the resources below. Consider the reflection questions to get to work.


     LEARN

    The 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge does not support nor endorse any advertisements associated with the above content.


    REFLECT AND TAKE ACTION

    Questions to Consider for Self-Reflection:

    • How can you become an informed ally?
    • What are three concrete ways that you can put this into practice in your daily life?

    Local Ways to Get Involved:

    Share What You Learned:

    Use the images below to share that you learned about race and equity today,
    and use be sure to include #ROCequity.

     Day 18 Being an Ally   21 Day challenge


    Did you Complete Day 18 of the Challenge?  YES       NO


    Comments (-1)
  • November 16 - Day 17: BUILDING A RACE EQUITY CULTURE

    Every person within an organization, group, and community contributes to the culture of that network. Building an equitable culture within our businesses, friend groups, family structures, and community interactions requires active efforts from each member to move forward.

    The term anti-racist has emerged in recent years to advance and replace previously well-meaning words like tolerance and acceptance. While they are not negative, the terms are passive and can be seen as neutral in the fight against racism. Being anti-racist is an active way to evolve, grow, and move toward racial equity.

    The National Museum of African American History & Culture says that for white people, this involves acknowledging their privilege, working to change internalized racism, and addressing racism when they see it. For people of color, it means recognizing how race and racism have been internalized, and whether it has been applied to others.

    There are many ways to be anti-racist as an individual and within the networks in which we exist. Review the information below for helpful suggestions and tools to engage in this important work.


     LEARN

    The 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge does not support nor endorse any advertisements associated with the above content.


    REFLECT AND TAKE ACTION

    Questions to Consider for Self-Reflection:

    • What is your workplace doing to build a race equity culture?
    • How can learning about policies, racial groups, and outcomes help support anti-racism efforts?

    Local Ways to Get Involved:

    Share What You Learned:

    Use the images below to share that you learned about race and equity today,
    and use be sure to include #ROCequity.

     Day 17 Building a Race Equity Culture   21 Day challenge


    Did you Complete Day 16 of the Challenge?  YES       NO


    Comments (-1)

United Way 21 Day Racial Equity Challenge

  • Join Superintendent Pero and PCSD employees by participating in Greater Rochester’s 21 Day Racial Equity Challenge with the United Way from October 23-November 20! As part of the 21-Day Equity Challenge, PCSD will be participating with more than 60,000 community members and 200 organizations in the Greater Rochester Area who are seeking to develop a deeper understanding of how inequity and racism affect our lives and our community.

    From October 23-November 20, links to articles, videos, podcasts, and reflections from the 21-Day Equity Challenge will be posted here. This self-directed learning opportunity has a daily commitment of only 10-15 minutes a day. Daily topics include Understanding Bias, Levels of Racism, Housing Inequities, Building a Race Equity Culture and many more. You may access this material starting Friday, October 23 here on this page.

    As a District, we share the goal of the United Way and the 21-Day Equity Challenge to “confront racism, bias and other social injustices to create a just and equitable community for all.” PCSD has been a long-standing partner with the United Way, and over the last five years, Pittsford Schools’ employees have donated more than $150,000 to support the United Way.

    We hope you’ll join the District and the United Way in this important work towards building greater understanding and equity in our schools and communities.

United Way 21 Equity Challenge

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